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In an opinion piece titled “I am tired of being a Jewish man’s rebellion,” Purcell — who describes herself as a blonde southern Protestant who can mix an “excellent, and very strong, martini” — says she has had it with Jewish men who agree to get serious, only to break it off and marry the kind of Jewish women “they said they weren’t actually looking for.” The two — count them: two — Jewish boyfriends she writes about had told her originally that Judaism was not a big part of their lives.

She calls them “lackadaisical” Jews who only celebrated the big holidays each year.

But as the relationships deteriorated, she says the fact that she wasn’t Jewish came to bother the men, and it repeatedly came up in conversations over time — along with other issues such as “money, careers and plans for the future.” After leaving her, both men wound up “settling down with a nice Jewish girl.” “I guess dating me had been their last act of defiance against cultural or familial expectations before finding someone who warranted their parents’ approval — perhaps the equivalent of a woman dating a motorcycle-driving, leather-jacket wearing ‘bad boy’ before settling down with a banker with a 9-5 job,” Purcell wrote in the piece published last Thursday.

“I now half-jokingly consider myself a Jewish man’s rebellion and guard myself against again landing in that role.” Readers railed against the essay for its perceived stereotyping, and mocked it in various outlets and social media.

“Just open Tinder to check it out,” they encourage.

“We’re sure these updates will make swiping even better and will lead to more meaningful matches.” But here’s a little factoid about that new algorithm that Tinder presumably will not be trumpeting: Dating site algorithms are meaningless. In fact, the research suggests that so-called “matching algorithms” are only negligibly better at matching people than random chance.

“It is virtually impossible to succeed at the task many matching sites have set for themselves,” Finkel et al. That’s ideal, because — while apps are really bad at predicting relationships long-term — they’re good, the research suggests, at helping you meet more people.

So if your goal’s a quick drink or a short-term hook-up that potentially leads to something more, then by all means — swipe on!

Right off the bat, this proves a major obstacle for matching algorithms.Tinder released an updated version of its matching algorithm today, a “big change” that CEO Sean Rad has been hyping for the past week.In a blog post, Tinder offered few details on the new algorithm — but basically promised that it would revolutionize the quantity quality of matches each user receives.They simply can’t account for your future circumstances or the way you’ll jibe with another person, particularly before you’ve met; they might attempt to model those things, but there’s not enough input data to account for the diversity of possible outcomes.Given that, matching algorithms tend to focus on personality alone — matching you with someone who’s similar to you, or similar enough that you won’t instantaneously swipe them off your phone.

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